Tag Archives: Social Media

What Facebook looked like on the day it launched

Facebook was founded by Mark Zuckerberg with his college roommates and fellow students Eduardo SaverinDustin Moskovitz and Chris Hughes. The Web site’s membership was initially limited by the founders to Harvard students when it launched in February 2004, but was expanded to other colleges in the Boston area, the Ivy League, and Stanford University.

As of July 2011, Facebook had more than 800 million active users.

(via)

Facebook launched in February 2004. Here is what it looked like.
Source: USA Today College
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New Year’s resolutions for small local businesses in 2011:

1. I promise to hire a real designer to revamp my website, logo, and sell sheets.

2. I promise to rethink Facebook and ask if it’s really right for my business.

3. I promise to pick one social media channel and use it to build my reputation as an expert in what I do for a living.

4. I promise to collect information and feedback from my customers and ask their permission before sending them things.

5. I promise to not use Copperplate Gothic or Comic Sans for any reason whatsoever.

6. I promise to befriend two members of the local media and tell them a story about my business.

7. I promise to take one day off per week and do anything BUT work.

8. I promise to attend chamber of commerce meetings in the city where my business is located.

9. I promise to reward my best employees for their hard work. Even in a bad economy, good help is hard to find.

10. I promise to ask 20 people what the biggest problem with my business is and then do something to fix it.

11. I promise to find someone to help me with SEO and SEM and track my website traffic with Google analytics.

12. I promise to explore and test a way for my customers to use their phones to interact with my business before the year is over.

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Retail Marketing & Fashion with Polyvore

We’ve been helping our clients expand their presence with social media sites like Facebook. Through this, we have come across some very cool platforms, applications, and add-ons. One of the sites we like for the retail world is Polyvore.com. Clothing retailers and brands should be learning all they can about them and how to incorporate them into your site and social networking strategies. Look at their app for Facebook.

Polyvore defines themselves this way:

Express your style.

Mix & match products from your favorite stores.

Shop looks created by the web’s largest fashion community.

This is what it looks like –
She's walking down the street, Blind to every eye she meets..Fashion Trends & Styles - Polyvore

She’s walking down the street, Blind to every eye she meets.. by maya3857 featuring Oasis bags

What does the site do? Polyvore allows people to create “sets” of clothes from different brands. The user/designer of the set is then able to add the set to their blog, share the set with the Polyvore community, buy the products in the set, and in the end, develop followers of the designers of the sets. It’s like having a virtual changing room with all of your favorite clothes from different designers in one place allowing you to mix and match.

Who should be on the site? Clothing brands of all kinds

Why should you be there? Thought leaders in fashion are engaging in the site. It’s primarily women right now.

Who develops the sets? Individual fashion enthusiasts and brands alike.

How to get involved? Contact us and we can help you out.  You can also sign up via their site.

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The Process of Building Your Recruitment Brand

I presented the 16 Tools to Build Your Brand and Recruit the Very Best at the NACE National Conference last week. Before we begin discussing each of the points from that presentation, I wanted to give an overview on our strategic process to recruiting so you have a frame of reference.

Campus Media has an internal philosophy about the process needed to be successful with recruitment marketing and advertising. Below is a diagram of the process, but let me explain each of these parts for you.

Campus Media's Strategic ProcessWe see a great deal of companies who look at the college market and start their marketing play with “we want to do ‘x’ or ‘y,'” but haven’t thought through what effect it will have on your organization. Many approach their brand building by doing the same things year after year. With how quickly things are changing these days, it’s  important to be conscious of each step and determine what the net effect is going to be before you start and execute your recruitment plan. Then start the process all over again for your next initiative. This process can be used annually or semi-annual depending on your budget and planning cycles. More often is better than not due to how fast the student mind-sets are changing these days. The economy is having a strong effect on this too. Two years ago a recruitment brand strategy was very different than it is today.

Let’s break apart each step:

1. Company – This is what you more than likely already have in place. It’s what your business, department, etc. has defined as who you are, why you do what you do as a company, what you want your consumers to think of your brand, your key competitive advantages and products.

2. Customer – In a recruitment context the customer is the student you are looking to influence/hire. You need to define what your consumer think of you. Most of the time your brand view doesn’t align with what the public thinks your brand is. This is where research comes in to play. What does the customer think your competitive advantages are? Why do they buy or want to work from you? What do you offer that others don’t? What’s your brand mean versus your competition? If your “Company” elements above don’t align with the “Customer’s” way of thinking and what’s important to them, then your campaign will not likely achieve the goals set out for the program that’s being developed.

3. Planning and Strategy – This stage is where the 16 tools start to come together and your ROI is developed. What message will you use? Where will the message be located? Do you need to make changes to how your teams are dressed or what they talk about when interacting with the students? When does your marketing happen? How does it help effect the disconnect that likely exists between stages 1 and 2 above? Do you need to make changes to your website or Facebook page or YouTube channel or handouts or booth design or videos or…or…or…? Run through everything to ensure each tool you use is on message and in the right places to cause the shift needed in your consumer’s mindset about your brand/company.

4. Execution – This is the “get it done” stage. Execute on the brand message, website strategies, on campus events, speaking, career fairs, social media, etc.

5. 20/20 – In this stage, take a look at what went well… or poorly. Do your follow up consumer research to see if your goals/objectives outlined in the planning and strategy stage occurred. What did you learn? Did you hire the students you expected to hire? Why or why not? In essence, you should be able to define if you hit the ROI elements you outlined in phase 3.

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