Free campus ads for nonprofits

college newspaper PSA nonprofit ads

Campus Media Group is accepting applications for the 2012/2013 College Newspaper PSA Program now called “Student Roar.”

Every year, Campus Media picks one deserving nonprofit organization and works to have that organization’s PSA ad placed in some of the nation’s top college and university newspapers free of charge. Hundreds of college newspapers throughout the United States participate each year, donating thousands of dollars in free advertising space.

Campus Media Group is a college marketing agency that represents more than 1,800 college newspapers nationally. Its experience placing ads for today’s top brands has given Campus Media the ability to work with university newspapers to secure donated media space.

In previous years, Campus Media has worked to build awareness for organizations such as: Inspire USA, The Campus Kitchens Project, the National Council on Problem Gambling, and the National Students of AMF.

Anastasia Goodstein of the Inspire USA Foundation, says, “Being chosen for the College Newspaper PSA program was wonderful for ReachOut.com. Our ads ran in hundreds of newspapers across the country driving traffic to our site, which offered resources and inspirational real stories from college students who have made it through a tough time. Working with Campus Media Group was a breeze and a pleasure. I highly recommend any non-profit organization trying to reach college students to apply for this program.”

This program is open to nonprofit organizations in the U.S. Those organizations looking for national exposure to a college audience about a cause that will resonate with students are encouraged to apply.

For more information on Campus Media or to obtain more information about the Student Roar College Newspaper PSA Program, please visit www.StudentRoar.com and apply online. Applications must be received by August 30, 2011.

Parents: The Coolest Roommates Ever

boomerang generation

After graduating from college, I took the next step to becoming a real adult. No, not getting a job, but moving back in with my parents. Besides the home-cooked meals and no bills to pay, the best part was that it did not feel strange. Many other friends who graduated made the same decision, and so had my older brothers. In addition, I was searching for a job very hard. In between TV commercial breaks, of course.

Until recently, I did not know so many young adults were making the decision to live with their parents after college. According to a new Pew Research Survey, 40% of those ages 18-24 are living with their parents. Not all of these young adults moved backed in with their parents, though; some never left home. This means that parents and their college-age kids are spending more time together. More time together means that parents have an influence on students.

Even while still in school, students live with or spend a lot of time with their parents. College summer breaks are long, and many students return home for break. These students living at home often count down the days until they go back to campus. The first two weeks of school are full of non-stop distractions that make youth attention spans even shorter than usual.

Breaking through noise on campus requires planning and a method for reaching students and parents before they arrive on campus.

This can be done in the following three ways:

1. Emailing students

2. Emailing parents

3. Sending direct mail to parents

Students (and parents) will have access to email during the summer regardless of where they are. Using direct mail will reach parents and students at their home residence.

Reaching students isn’t always about being on campus or sending things directly to them. Parents are still holding their college-age kids’ hands later in life, which opens up a new demographic for millennial marketers. These new “roommates” may be as valuable as the students themselves — maybe not the coolest roommates ever, but hey…

For more stats on this topic, click here.

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BRAD: Berkeley Ridiculously Automated Dorm

Berkeley student, Derek Lowe, designed and implemented a fully automated dorm room with lots of cool features. The room can be controlled with a remote, a smartphone app, a tablet app, or by voice. The lights, curtains, and alarm clock are all fully automated and have multiple modes, including “Romantic Mode” and “Party Mode.” I’m assuming these aren’t actually used very often, but I appreciate the optimism.

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